Tag Archive: Life


Move your Body : Samba Style


Samba  is a Brazilian dance and musical genre originating in Bahia and with its roots in Brazil (Rio De Janeiro) and Africa via the West African slave trade and African religious traditions. It is recognized around the world as a symbol of Brazil and the Brazilian Carnival. Considered one of the most popular Brazilian cultural expressions, samba has become an icon of Brazilian national identity. The Bahian Samba de Roda (dance circle), which became a UNESCO Heritage of Humanity in 2005, is the main root of the samba carioca, the samba that is played and danced in Rio de Janeiro.

The modern samba that emerged at the beginning of the 20th century is basically 2/4 tempo varied with the conscious use of chorus sung to the sound of palms and batucada rhythm, adding one or more parts or stanzas of declaratory verses. Traditionally, the samba is played by strings (cavaquinho and various types of guitar) and various percussion instruments such as tamborim. Influenced by American orchestras in vogue since the Second World War and the cultural impact of US music post-war, samba began to use trombones, trumpets, choros, flutes, and clarinets.

The Samba National Day is celebrated on December 2. The date was established at the initiative of Luis Monteiro da Costa, an Alderman of Salvador, in honor of Ary Barroso. He composed “Na Baixa do Sapateiro” even though he had never been in Bahia. Thus 2 December marked the first visit of the Ary Barroso to Salvador. Initially, this day was celebrated only in Salvador, but eventually it turned into a national holiday.

Samba is a root style in Southeastern Brazil and Northeast Brazil, especially in Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Salvador and Belo Horizonte. Its importance as Brazil’s national music transcends region, however; samba schools, samba musicians and carnival organizations centered around the performance of samba exist in every region of the country and, while regional musics prevail in other regions (for instance, in Southern Brazil, Center-West Brazil, and all of the Brazilian countryside, Sertanejo, or Brazilian country music, is extremely important),[5] there is no single musical genre that Brazilians use with more regularity than samba to identify themselves as part of the same national culture.

Move your Body :Samba Style
Move your Body : Samba Style
Move your Body :Samba Style
Move your Body : Samba Style

Move your body: Samba style

Watch BRANGELINA do it

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Smooth Criminal” is the seventh single from Michael Jackson‘s 1987 Bad album. The song contains a fast-paced beat intertwined with Jackson’s lyrics about a woman named Annie, who has been attacked in her apartment by a “smooth” assailant. It was released as a single on October 24, 1988 and peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100.[1] It was re-released on April 10, 2006 as a part of the Visionary: The Video Singles box-set. The re-released Visionary single charted at No. 19 in the UK. The piece is one of Jackson’s signature songs, and has appeared on numerous greatest hits albums, including Number Ones, The Essential Michael Jackson, Michael Jackson: The Ultimate Collection, King of Pop and This Is It (for the New version of song).

“Smooth Criminal” was a song that almost didn’t make it into the Bad album, with Jackson having to convince producer Quincy Jones that it was worthy of inclusion. With the final decision to include the song, Jackson originally decided to make the short film a western-styled short film. However, he later decided to change the style into a 1930s nightclub style.

The song was performed live during the second leg of Jackson’s 1988–89 Bad World Tour. The performance featured a dance routine modeled after the scene from Moonwalker. By the time the 1992 Dangerous World Tour came around, this performance became a regular on Jackson tours, including his HIStory Tour. A spoken word and synth recording preceded the song on the second leg of the Bad tour and on the subsequent Dangerous World Tour, the same recording having been used as an intro for the song “This Place Hotel” on the first leg of the Bad Tour. By the time of the Dangerous Tour, Jackson had devised a way to perform the patented anti-gravity lean, which was featured in the Moonwalker video, on stage. Much like the robot move from “Dancing Machine” and the Moonwalk from “Billie Jean“, this showcased Jackson’s talent for creating unique moves to enhance stage performances. This performance can be seen on the Bucharest Dangerous Tour performance which is included as a DVD in The Ultimate Collection boxed set.

Part of the song was also briefly used in the middle of the live version of the song “Dangerous” since Jackson’s performance at the 1995 MTV Video Music Awards. In the HIStory Tour, he used a small snippet of this song during his performance of “Dangerous“. Jackson was also going to use it again in his “Dangerous” performance in his This Is It concerts, along with the full track, had the concert series not been canceled due to his sudden death.

Spin, Lean and Moon Walk : Smooth Criminal Style

Spin and Moon Walk : Smooth Criminal Style

Spin, Lean and Moon Walk : Smooth Criminal Style
Anti Gravity Lean  : Smooth Criminal Style

Spin, Lean and Moon Walk : Smooth Criminal Style


Thefamous dance scene Vincent Vega (John Travolta) and Mia Wallace (Uma Thurman) do the twist at Jack Rabbit Slim’s.

In a virtually empty cocktail lounge, aging prizefighter Butch Coolidge (Bruce Willis) accepts a large sum of money from Marsellus (Ving Rhames), agreeing to take a dive in his upcoming match. Vincent and Jules—now inexplicably dressed in T-shirts and shorts—arrive to deliver the briefcase, and Butch and Vincent briefly cross paths. The next day, Vincent drops by the house of Lance (Eric Stoltz) and Jody (Rosanna Arquette) to score some high-grade heroin. He shoots up before driving over to meet Mrs. Mia Wallace (Uma Thurman) and take her out. They head to Jack Rabbit Slim’s, a 1950s-themed restaurant staffed by lookalikes of the decade’s pop icons. Mia recounts her experience acting in a failed television pilot, “Fox Force Five”.

After participating in a twist contest, they return to the Wallace house with the trophy. While Vincent is in the bathroom, Mia finds his stash of heroin in his coat pocket. Mistaking it for cocaine, she snorts it and overdoses. Vincent rushes her to Lance’s house for help. Together, they administer an adrenaline shot to Mia’s heart, reviving her. Before parting ways, Mia and Vincent agree not to tell Marsellus of the incident.

Learn to Dance: Do the Twist

Learn to Dance: Do the Twist


Learn to Dance: Do the Twist

Learn to Dance: Do the Twist

Learn to Dance: Do the Twist